/ / The Palace of the Parliament of the province of Dauphine: photos, description Palais du parlement du Dauphine)

The Palace of the Parliament of the province of Dauphine: photos, description Palais du parlement du Dauphine)

The Dauphine is one of the historical provinces of France, which after the adoption of the new system of administrative-territorial division in 1790 ceased to exist. Center of the province was the city of Grenoble, and the name of the province got the name from the title of the rulers of the two counties of Auvergne and Venue included in the Dauphine.

The Palace in question was built in the XV-XVI centuries. It is located on the place Saint-andré, next to the Cathedral of Grenoble. Until 1790, the Palace became the seat of provincial Parliament, and then until 2002, this building was the Palace of justice, containing the courts of appeals, civil, commercial and jury.

The Parliament of the province was one of the local authorities. It was created in the XIV century and was called the Council of Dauphine, and then in 1453 by order of Louis XI was transformed into the highest judicial body and became known as Parliament. In addition to Grenoble, these authorities were at that time only in two cities, Paris and Toulouse.

The construction of the Palace was carried out during the reign of three monarchs. Under Louis XII at the beginning of the XVI century was built the Central part of the building, selecting the style of "flaming Gothic", and as the stone is a soft ivory hue. When Francis I and Charles IX in the middle of the XVI century, the building was completed two more times, and the interior was continued in the next century. Active participation in the interior were made by German sculptor Paul JUD, who is the author of the wooden parts are decorated with carvings. The right wing of the Palace in the French Gothic style appeared in the XVI century, the left, the Renaissance in the late nineteenth century.

In 1788, the Parliament of the province has not approved a number of decrees of Louis XVI, and the king ordered to dissolve it. This decision led to a popular revolt, which entered the history of Grenoble as the Day of tiles, and the Parliament was closed only two years later.