/ / The archaeological complex Fratte: photos, description (Area archeologica etrusco-sannitica di Fratte)

The archaeological complex Fratte: photos, description (Area archeologica etrusco-sannitica di Fratte)

The archaeological complex Fratte is one of the main tourist attractions of the Spa town of Salerno on the Amalfi Riviera. Unique in its kind complex located on the North-Eastern outskirts of Salerno, on a low hill on the left Bank of the river IRNA - once a center of ancient settlements. The most ancient artifacts found here belong to the bronze age, a permanent settlement emerged only in the 6th century BC with the advent of Etruscan tribes. The place was not chosen by chance - it offers good views over the fertile valley of the IRNA and the road, which connected Capua and Pontecagnano two important Etruscan center. Probably the natives of these two cities were the first inhabitants of Fratte. In the 4th century BC the Fratta was conquered by the tribes of the Samnites, and at the end of the 2nd century BC, destroyed during the war between Ancient Rome and Carthage. By the way, the name Fratte this settlement became known as modern scientists, and his real name of Etruscans and Romans, is still unknown.

The first findings in the territory of the Fratta was made in the early 19th century, it was the artefacts of 6th century BC - 2nd century ad, discovered during the construction of the road. In 1900, the year began systematic archaeological excavations it was found more than 200 graves of the 4-5th centuries BC And in the course of recent excavations it was discovered 150 graves.

Today on the territory of the ancient city of Fratte you can see the Acropolis, fragments of street pavements, ruins of houses, ruins of Etruscan temple, a vast Roman thermal baths and large water tanks with unusual shapes. The only part of the complex, Dating from the period of domination of the Samnites (4-3-th century BC), is the necropolis of the eight graves located on the Eastern side of the hill. Many of the exhibits found in the Fratta, today exhibited in the Provincial archaeological Museum of Salerno.